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Sunday, May 22, 2011

Coin a Phrase

Complete Works of William Shakespeare. 154 Sonnets, 37 Plays (Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Hamlet, Macbeth...) & the narrative poems (Venus and Adonis, The Rape of Lucrece...)"To be or not to be..."


"Beware of the Ides of March..."

"Something is afoul in Denmark..."

"Et tu, Brute?..."

William Shakespeare's Hamlet (Two-Disc Special Edition)Hamlet Julius Caesar.   Shakespeare wrote all of these words. They are contained within his plays and have echoed on stage and in classrooms for years.
 

We can say that we don't put much stock in what others have to say, but our own actions dispel that notion. Attend any seminar throughout the nation, listen to any speech on the radio or TV, or read any editorial in your local newspaper and you will see that many of these same people use quotes from others to drive home their point. The quotes may serve as accent points to highlight the theme and meaning of the author's point.

HamletTest the theory. Visit quotations page on the Web to see quotes available by subject or topic. See how you may be able to use quotes and add some color to your presentations and reports. Include some background information that helps shed light on the quote's connection to your topic or theme.

These words seem like something good to share to break the ice and open a speech:


How fortunate for governments that the people they administer don't think.

Inactivity is death.
I find capitalism repugnant.

Be sure to study up the author of the quote. You do not want to quote someone who was totally opposed to government and bureaucracy when you go to endorse a political candidate. Inform yourself with as much information as possible related to the author and the context of your quote.
Why?

The quotes above come from: Adolf Hitler, Benito Mussolini, and Fidel Castro. It does matter where you get your material from.
Famous Quotes from 100 Great People (Mobi Reference)

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